Coast Guard Station Port Aransas holds change-of-command

Coast Guard Master Chief Petty Officer Jeffery Scully relieves Master Chief Petty Officer Edward Iversen as the commanding officer of Coast Guard Station Port Aransas during a change of command ceremony in Port Aransas, Texas, July 27, 2020. Capt. Edward Gaynor, commander of Coast Guard Sector/Air Station Corpus Christi, presided over the ceremony. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Master Chief Petty Officer Jeffery Scully relieves Master Chief Petty Officer Edward Iversen as the commanding officer of Coast Guard Station Port Aransas July 27, 2020. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas — Coast Guard Master Chief Petty Officer Jeffery Scully relieved Master Chief Petty Officer Edward Iversen as the commanding officer of Coast Guard Station Port Aransas during a change of command ceremony in Port Aransas, Texas, Monday.

Capt. Edward Gaynor, commander of Coast Guard Sector/Air Station Corpus Christi, presided over the ceremony.

Scully is reporting from Oswego, N.Y., where he served as the officer-in-charge of Station Oswego, a multi-mission station servicing the westernmost portion of Lake Ontario.

Station Port Aransas is a multi-mission station capable of conducting search and rescue, law enforcement, security, and environmental protection operations. Working in close coordination with other state, local, and federal partners, the station also plays a critical role in securing the nation’s third largest port by tonnage. Station Port Aransas has had a life-saving presence along the Gulf of Mexico since it was established by an act of Congress in 1878. The station’s current location, situated on the north end of Mustang Island, was purchased by the federal government in 1911 and has been rebuilt several times since then.

The change-of-command ceremony is a time-honored tradition and deeply rooted in Coast Guard and Naval history. The event signifies a total transfer of responsibility, authority and accountability of the command.

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