Coast Guard Station Bodega Bay holds change of command

Senior Chief Petty Officer Jeremiah M. Wolf assumes command of Coast Guard Station Bodega Bay from Senior Chief Petty Officer Scott E. Slade during a change-of-command ceremony, June 21, 2018, in Bodega Bay, California. Station Bodega Bay is one of 20 surf stations in the Coast Guard and has an area of responsibility that stretches from the Sonoma county line at Gualala River south to Point Reyes. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Cory J. Mendenhall/Released)

Senior Chief Petty Officer Jeremiah M. Wolf assumes command of Coast Guard Station Bodega Bay from Senior Chief Petty Officer Scott E. Slade during a change-of-command ceremony, June 21, 2018, in Bodega Bay, California. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Cory J. Mendenhall)

SAN FRANCISCO — Senior Chief Petty Officer Jeremiah M. Wolf relieved Senior Chief Petty Officer Scott E. Slade as the officer in charge of Coast Guard Station Bodega Bay, Thursday, during a change-of-command ceremony at the station.

Capt. Tony Ceraolo, the Coast Guard Sector San Francisco commander, presided over the event.

“I’m thrilled to be here standing here today at Bodega Bay where everything started,” said Wolf, who served at Station Bodega Bay as a petty officer 18 years ago. “I will work tirelessly and I’ll start by building on the climate of compassion, teamwork and excellence that has been laid for me at Station Bodega Bay.”

Slade is scheduled to report to Coast Guard Station Umpqua River in Winchester Bay, Oregon to serve as the officer in charge. Wolf was previously assigned to the National Motor Lifeboat School in Ilwaco, Washington.

The change-of-command ceremony is a time-honored tradition aboard ships and shore commands. It represents a total transfer of responsibility, authority and accountability from one individual to another. The event ensures the continuity of leadership and operations within the station’s area of responsibility.

Commissioned in 1963, Station Bodega Bay conducts Coast Guard operations along the California coast from Point Reyes north to the Gualala River. Thirty crew members conduct the missions of search and rescue, maritime law enforcement and surf rescue operations. The station is one of 20 designated surf stations in the Coast Guard, meaning crew members and station rescue boats are qualified and capable of operating in heavy surf conditions.

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