Coast Guard responds to 2 separate distress calls offshore Freeport, Texas

Coast Guard Station Freeport 45-foot Response Boat-Medium file photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Jared Cleberg

Coast Guard Station Freeport 45-foot Response Boat-Medium file photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Jared Cleberg

HOUSTON — The Coast Guard responded to two separate distress calls from mariners aboard disabled vessels offshore Freeport, Texas, Saturday.

Coast Guard Sector Houston-Galveston watchstanders received a report of a disabled pleasure craft with five adults aboard. The report stated one of the mariners required medication that was not taken with him due to the unforeseen amount of time on the water. Watchstanders issued an urgent marine information broadcast and diverted the crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Sea Horse.

Once on scene, the crew of the CGC Sea Horse transferred all five individuals to the cutter and transported them to the Freeport Marina. The vessel was left at anchor, and the owner will coordinate salvage.

There were no reported injuries.

In a separate case, Coast Guard Sector Houston-Galveston watchstanders received a mayday distress call from the operator of another disabled pleasure craft with three adults and one child aboard concerned about their safety due to the growing sea state.

Watchstanders issued an urgent marine information broadcast and diverted a Coast Guard Air Station Houston MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew and a Coast Guard  Station Freeport 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew.

A good Samaritan vessel was first on scene and transferred all four mariners to their vessel before placing the disabled vessel in tow.

After arriving on scene, the crew of the RB-M transferred the three adults and child from the good Samaritan vessel to the RB-M and relieved the tow.

A Coast Guard Station Port O’Connor 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew then relieved the tow and transported the mariners to Station Port O’Connor.

There were no reported injuries.

“We remind all mariners that proper planning and weather monitoring are vital to safe voyages on the water,” said Zack Edwards, Sector Houston-Galveston command duty officer. “Seas can build rapidly during a storm and careful attention to marine weather forecasts, staying alert to sudden changes and proper planning can make the difference between an enjoyable day on the water and a life-threatening search and rescue event.”

In vicinity of the storm, weather was reported as 6-foot seas with 40 mph wind gusts.

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