Coast Guard rescues stranded wind surfer near Coyote Point

A Coast Guard Station San Francisco 45-foot Response Boat crew rescues a stranded wind surfer after he became separated from his gear off Coyote Point near San Mateo, California, Sept. 18, 2018. A Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew, San Mateo Fire Department personnel, Coyote Point Harbor Master personnel and a good Samaritan also responded. (U.S. Coast Guard photo /Released)

A Coast Guard Station San Francisco 45-foot Response Boat crew rescues a stranded wind surfer after he became separated from his gear off Coyote Point near San Mateo, California, Sept. 18, 2018.  (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

SAN FRANCISCO — The Coast Guard, partner agencies and a good Samaritan rescued a stranded wind surfer after he became separated from his gear near Coyote Point, Tuesday evening.

The wind surfer contacted Coast Guard Sector San Francisco watchstanders via handheld VHF radio at approximately 5 p.m., reporting that he was separated from his gear, was not wearing a life jacket and was in need of immediate assistance.

Sector San Francisco watchstanders issued an urgent marine information broadcast, dispatched a Coast Guard Station San Francisco 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew and a Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew to the scene.

San Mateo Fire Department personnel, Coyote Point Harbor Master personnel and a good Samaritan also arrived on scene.

Working with partner agencies and the good Samaritan, the Station San Francisco boat crew embarked the wind surfer and transported him to awaiting emergency services personnel at Coyote Point Harbor.

“Having a handheld VHF radio enabled the wind surfer to immediately call the Coast Guard for help once he realized he was in trouble,” said Petty Officer 1st Class Jeffery Taylor, a Sector San Francisco command center operations specialist. “We urge anyone getting out on the water to always have a VHF marine radio with them, as they are the most reliable way to contact the Coast Guard in an emergency. It’s also paramount that anyone heading out on the water wear a life jacket.”

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