Coast Guard repatriates 55 people to Cuba

Coast Guard Cutter Vigilant's small boat crew transports people to the ship about 25 miles south of Big Pine Key, Florida, June 11, 2022. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Coast Guard Cutter Vigilant’s small boat crew transports people to the ship about 25 miles south of Big Pine Key, Florida, June 11, 2022. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

MIAMI — Coast Guard Cutter Issac Mayo’s crew repatriated 55 Cubans to Cuba, Friday, following interdictions off the Florida Keys.

Coast Guard Cutter Vigilant’s crew alerted Sector Key West watchstanders of a rustic vessel, Saturday, at approximately 6:30 p.m., about 25 miles south of Big Pine Key.

Coast Guard Station Miami’s crew alerted Sector Miami watchstanders of a rustic vessel, Sunday, at approximately 10:15 a.m., about 15 miles southeast of Government Cut.

A good Samaritan notified Coast Guard Sector Key West watchstanders of a rustic vessel, Sunday, at approximately 2:30 p.m., about 13 miles south of Marquesas Key.

A good Samaritan notified Coast Guard Sector Key West watchstanders of a rustic vessel, Monday, at approximately 12:15 p.m., about 17 miles south of Boca Chica.

Coast Guard Air Station Miami’s HC-144 Ocean Sentry aircrew alerted Sector Key West watchstanders of a rustic vessel, Tuesday, at approximately 10 p.m., about 20 miles southwest of Elbow Cay, Bahamas.

“Seek a safe, legal way to immigrate rather than enduring the dangers of the high seas,” said Lt. Cmdr. Tanner Stiehl, Coast Guard Seventh District. “The possibility of being stopped by Coast Guard crews while illegally migrating through the Caribbean Sea is high.”

Since Oct. 1, 2021, Coast Guard crews interdicted 2,464 Cubans compared to:

  • 5,396 Cuban Migrants in Fiscal Year 2016
  • 1,468 Cuban Migrants in Fiscal Year 2017
  • 259 Cuban Migrants in Fiscal Year 2018
  • 313 Cuban Migrants in Fiscal Year 2019
  • 49 Cuban Migrants in Fiscal Year 2020
  • 838 Cuban Migrants in Fiscal Year 2021

Once aboard a Coast Guard cutter, all migrants receive food, water, shelter and basic medical attention.

For more news follow us on Twitter and Facebook. For recent photographs follow us on Flickr.


If you have any problems viewing this article, please report it here.