Coast Guard repatriates 5 migrants to Cuba

Coast Guard Station Lake Worth Inlet smallboat crew stops a migrant sea voyage due to safety of life at sea concerns, Feb. 20,2021, approximately 2 miles southeast of Lake Worth Inlet. The Coast Guard Cutter Raymond Evans crew repatriated the five Cubans to Cuba, Tuesday. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Coast Guard Station Lake Worth Inlet smallboat crew stops a migrant sea voyage due to safety of life at sea concerns, Feb. 20,2021, approximately 2 miles southeast of Lake Worth Inlet. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

MIAMI — The Coast Guard Cutter Raymond Evans (WPC-1110) crew repatriated five Cubans to Cuba, Tuesday, after a Coast Guard Station Lake Worth Inlet small boat crew stopped their sea voyage.

A good Samaritan reported to Coast Guard Sector Miami watchstanders that a raft with five people aboard was drifting, Saturday, approximately two miles southeast of Lake Worth Inlet.

A Coast Guard Station Lake Worth Inlet crew embarked the five male Cubans and transferred them to the cutter Raymond Evans crew. During the interdiction, the migrants reported they had been at sea for 16 days.

Once aboard a Coast Guard cutter, all migrants received food, water, shelter and basic medical attention. Throughout the interdiction, Coast Guard crewmembers were equipped with personal protective equipment to minimize potential exposure to any possible case of COVID-19. There were no migrants in these cases reported to have any COVID-19 related symptoms.

“Attempting to smuggle yourself into the U.S. via the maritime environment is both extremely dangerous and illegal,” said Lt. Cmdr. Mario Gil, Coast Guard liaison officer, U.S. Embassy Havana. “With the consistent danger these ventures present, our crews and partner agencies remain persistently vigilant to protect lives and enforce U.S. federal laws.”‎

This fiscal year, more than 100 Cuban migrants have been interdicted trying to illegally cross into the U.S. through the Florida straits.

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