Coast Guard repatriates 188 people to Haiti

A small boat from Coast Guard Cutter Tahoma ferries Haitians from the ship to Cap-Haitien, Haiti, March 22, 2022. 188 Haitians were repatriated following an interdiction on March 19, 2022. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Coast Guard Cutter Tahoma's crew)

A small boat from Coast Guard Cutter Tahoma ferries Haitians from the ship to Cap-Haitien, Haiti, March 22, 2022. 188 Haitians were repatriated following an interdiction on March 19, 2022. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Coast Guard Cutter Tahoma’s crew)

MIAMI — Coast Guard Cutter Tahoma’s crew repatriated 188 people to Haiti, Tuesday, following an interdiction approximately 20 miles off Cap Du Mole, Haiti.

Coast Guard Cutters William Flores and Tahomas’ crews reported the overloaded and unsafe vessel to Coast Guard District Seven watchstanders, Saturday, at approximately 5:30 a.m.

Due to the deteriorating weather, 126 men, 52 women, and 17 children voluntarily left their vessel. The sea state at the time was 5-foot seas.

“We have increased our air and sea patrols across the region in close coordination with our interagency and international partners,” said Coast Guard Seventh District Commander Rear Adm. Brendan McPherson. “We are also sharing information and resources to save lives and secure our maritime border. The U.S. Coast Guard will fully leverage the capabilities, people, and partnerships we have in the region to prevent the loss of life. These voyages are always dangerous and often deadly. This remains, first and foremost, a safety of life mission for us.”

Since Oct, 1, 2020, Coast Guard crews have interdicted 2,284 Haitian migrants compared to:

  • 1,527 Haitian Migrants in Fiscal Year 2021
  • 418 Haitian Migrants in Fiscal Year 2020
  • 932 Haitian Migrants in Fiscal Year 2019
  • 609 Haitian Migrants in Fiscal Year 2018
  • 419 Haitian Migrants in Fiscal Year 2017

Once aboard a Coast Guard cutter, all migrants receive food, water, shelter and basic medical attention.

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