Coast Guard opens ports in Puerto Rico, responds to beached sailing vessel

The 54-foot sailing vessel Grand Filou lays beached at Las Mareas in Guayama, Puerto Rico during the passing of Tropical Storm Isaias July 30, 2020. A Coast Guard pollution response team from Sector San Juan’s Incident Management Division is responding to the beached vessel that may be holding up to 105 gallons of diesel in the vessel’s fuel tanks.

The 54-foot sailing vessel Grand Filou lays beached at Las Mareas in Guayama, Puerto Rico during the passing of Tropical Storm Isaias July 30, 2020.

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — The Coast Guard reopened all ports in Puerto Rico Friday following the passing of Tropical Storm Isaias, while a Coast Guard pollution team is responding to a beached sailing vessel at Las Mareas in Guayama, Puerto Rico.

All maritime ports in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands are in Port Condition FOUR and open to all vessel traffic. Mariners should use caution due to floating debris and report any abnormalities to the Coast Guard.

The beached sailing vessel is the 54-foot Grand Filou, the Coast Guard has not received any reports of anyone missing or overdue from this case.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector San Juan received a call from a person at the scene, who reported the beached vessel and that there was a strong smell of diesel in the area and a sheen located within the vessel’s hull.

The Grand Filou may be holding up to 105 gallons of diesel in the vessel’s fuel tank.

“The maritime impacts from sunken or beached vessels following Tropical Storm Isaias has been minimal,” said Lt. Cmdr. Alberto Martinez, Chief of the Sector San Juan Incident Management Division. “In addition to maritime search and rescue and reopening ports and navigable waterways following a tropical storm, one of the Coast Guard’s primary objectives is to identify and respond to any incidents of pollution that may threaten the pristine environment of the coastal waters in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.”

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