Coast Guard halts illegal charter near Baker’s Haulover Inlet

Two Coast Guard Station Fort Lauderdale 33-foot Special Purpose Craft—Law Enforcement boat crewmembers conducting a boarding of the 64-foot motor yacht, Cary On, in Baker's Haulover Inlet Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. The Cary On's voyage was terminated after discovering multiple safety violations. U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy of Station Fort Lauderdale

Two Coast Guard Station Fort Lauderdale 33-foot Special Purpose Craft—Law Enforcement boat crewmembers conducting a boarding of the 64-foot motor yacht, Cary On, in Baker’s Haulover Inlet Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy of Station Fort Lauderdale

MIAMI — The Coast Guard terminated the voyage of a vessel for violating small passenger laws and regulations in Miami on Monday.

A Coast Guard Station Fort Lauderdale 33-foot Special Purpose Craft—Law Enforcement crew conducted a boarding of the 64-foot motor yacht Cary On, with 13 passengers aboard in the vicinity of Baker’s Haulover Inlet. The Coast Guard crew discovered the following violations:

  • Violation of 46 C.F.R. 176.100(a) for not having a valid Certificate of Inspection.
  • Violation of 46 C.F.R. 15.515(b) for failure to not having a credentialed mariner in control.
  • Violation of 46 C.F.R. 16.201 for failure to have a drug and alcohol program.
  • Violation of 46 C.F.R. 170.120 for failure to have a valid stability letter.

The owners and operators of illegal charter vessels can face maximum civil penalties of $41,456 for this illegal passenger-for-hire operation.

“You put your life at risk when you board a charter vessel with an operator who is not properly certified to take paying passengers,” said Mr. Victor Rivera, Coast Guard Sector Miami command duty officer. “You have a right to ask for proper credentials. Charters that aren’t operated under the proper regulations can put passengers in danger and are subject to fines and potential civil penalties.”

Potential fines for illegally operating a charter vessel include:

  • Up to $18,477 for failure of an inspected vessel to be under the control of an individual with the appropriate Coast Guard license.
  • Up to $7,250 for failure of operators to be enrolled in a chemical testing program.
  • Up to $23,436 for failure to provide a Coast Guard Certificate of Inspection for vessels carrying more than six passengers.
  • Up to $15,995 for failure to produce a valid Certificate of Documentation for vessels over 5 gross tons.

The investigation is ongoing.

If you have any problems viewing this article, please report it here.

Related Posts

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.