Coast Guard, good Samaritan assist disabled vessel 39 miles north of Freeport

The Viking Lady crew activated their Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon. After attempting towing the Viking Lady, commercial salvage experienced difficulties to proceed due to the sea conditions were not optimal for transiting. The Coast Guard Cutter Margaret Norvell (WPC-1105) crew arrived on scene and relieved commercial salvage safely taking in tow the Viking Lady and transporting the Viking Lady. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

A Coast Guard Cutter Margaret Norvell smallboat crew prepares to assist the Viking Lady. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

MIAMI — The Coast Guard assisted a disabled 45-foot pleasure craft, Viking Lady, with four people aboard 39 miles north of Freeport, Bahamas, Sunday.

The Coast Guard Cutter Margaret Norvell (WPC-1105) and crew safely towed the vessel and crew to a commercial salvage vessel, who took over the towing operations for further transport of the Viking Lady to New River, Ft. Lauderdale.

Coast Guard District 7 watchstanders received notification that a disabled vessel was experiencing issues with its fuel transfer pump and was anchored. The Viking Lady crew activated its Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon to provide specific location information, in which a commercial salvage vessel crew responded. A Coast Guard Air Station Miami MH-65 Dolphin helicopter aircrew also responded to the EPIRB and located the Viking Lady and crew.


After the commercial salvage vessel attempted towing the Viking Lady, it began experiencing difficulties to proceed due to the sea conditions. The Coast Guard Cutter Margaret Norvell crew arrived on scene and relieved the commercial salvage vessel safely taking the Viking Lady in tow. The Margaret Norvell crew transported the Viking Lady and crew to another commercial salvage vessel near Ft. Lauderdale.

“It is critically important to register your EPIRB. It is easy to register and this will help the Coast Guard establish quickly that your call is legitimate and it will help them to know what to look for, as well as give your information and emergency contact,” said Lt. Ray Lopez, Coast Guard Sector Miami Command Center duty officer. “Having your safety equipment available while you are traveling through the water may save your life in a distress situation.”


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