Coast Guard Cutter Stratton departs India after engagement with Indian coast guard

Coast Guard Cutter Stratton (WMSL 752) sales alongside the Indian coast guard ships Abheed and Shaurya (16) Aug. 23, 2019, while transiting in the Bay of Bengal off the coast of Chennai, India. The Stratton is participating in a professional exchange with the Indian coast guard that includes operational exercises at sea and on shore. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Stephen Esterly)

Coast Guard Cutter Stratton sales alongside the Indian coast guard ships Abheed and Shaurya (16) Aug. 23, 2019, while transiting in the Bay of Bengal off the coast of Chennai, India. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Stephen Esterly)

CHENNAI, India – The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Stratton (WMSL 752) departed Tuesday from Chennai after a multi-day engagement with the Indian coast guard.

The Stratton is working under the tactical control of the U.S. Navy to enhance cooperation among strategic partners in the Indo-Pacific. Both the U.S. Coast Guard and the Indian coast guard play a critical role to ensure free and open access to the Indo-Pacific maritime commons.

Stratton, the first U.S. Coast Guard ship to visit Chennai Port, was welcomed by a senior delegation of Indian coast guard officials, military band and dozens of schoolchildren waving Indian and American flags.

The Stratton crew conducted at-sea exercises, including small boat operations, communications, navigation, law enforcement, search and rescue, formation steaming and joint helicopter flight operations prior to pulling into Chennai for continued participation in shore side engagements. Shore side subject matter exchanges included an equipment showcase, operations planning and a vessel boarding demonstration. Formal receptions were held aboard the Stratton and the Indian the coast guard ship Shuarya, allowing for cultural exchange and social interaction among the two nation’s crews.

The reception aboard the Stratton was hosted by the U.S. Consulate Chennai, Consul General Robert Burgess, to recognize Indian-owned shipping companies for their efforts and volunteer membership in the Automated Mutual Assistance Vessel Rescue System (AMVER), which is celebrating 61 years of rescuing mariners. The opportunity allowed the Stratton to serve as the platform to recognize international AMVER partners who have a shared interest in safety of life at sea.

“The U.S. Coast Guard was pleased to work with the India coast guard to further our shared interest in a rules-based, free and open Indo-Pacific,” said Capt. Bob Little, commanding officer Stratton. “We enjoyed several days of in-harbor and at-sea exercises to advance our capabilities to combat maritime threats such as trans-national crime, terrorism, illegal fishing and more. India is among the United States’ most valuable strategic partners in the Indo-Pacific, and this visit was an outstanding opportunity to strengthen that partnership.”

Stratton, a 418-foot national security cutter, departed its homeport of Alameda, California, June 12 for a months-long deployment to the Western Pacific. Operating under the tactical control of U.S. 7th Fleet, the cutter and crew are engaging in professional exchanges and capacity-building exercises with partner nations and will patrol and conduct operations as directed.


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