Coast Guard Cutter Ibis receives new commander

Lt. j.g. Karida J. Harris relieves Lt. James Martin of his duty as commander of Coast Guard cutter Ibis in a change of command ceremony, July 23, 2020, Ft. Pierce, Florida. The change-of-command ceremony is a time-honored military tradition that marks a transfer of total responsibility and authority from one individual to another. (Coast Guard photo by Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Delgado.)

Lt. j.g. Karida J. Harris relieves Lt. James Martin of his duty as commander of Coast Guard cutter Ibis in a change of command ceremony, July 23, 2020, Ft. Pierce, Florida. (Coast Guard photo by Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Delgado.)

MIAMI — Coast Guard Cutter Ibis’ crew held a change-of-command Thursday in Ft. Pierce.

During the ceremony, Lt. j.g. Karida J. Harris assumed command from Lt. James T. Martin.

“It was an honor to serve at sea with some of the finest men and woman the Coast Guard has to offer,” said Martin.

Martin is transferring to Joint Inter-agency Task Force-South, Key West.

Harris’ previous tour was was aboard Coast Guard Cutter Valiant.

“It is an honor to be entrusted with such a great deal of responsibility so early in my Coast Guard career,” said Harris. “The crew of the Ibis demonstrates the utmost respect and commitment to each other, this ship, and the American people.”

Harris is the second African-American female to command a ship in the Coast Guard.

“I thank those who have and continue to break barriers and overcome obstacles, such as Lt. Cmdr. Felicia Thomas, the first black female to command afloat,” said Harris. “I hope my efforts in this position serve to introduce and inspire more underrepresented men and women to the vast opportunities our nation has to offer.”

Capt. Jo-Ann F. Burdian, Sector Miami commanding officer, presided over the ceremony.

Coast Cutter Ibis is homeported in Ft. Pierce, Florida and has a crew complement of 11.

The change-of-command ceremony is a time-honored military tradition that marks a transfer of total responsibility and authority from one individual to another. The ceremony is conducted in order to formally demonstrate the continuity of authority within a U.S. military command.

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