Coast Guard assists 2 fishermen near Cay Sal, Bahamas

Two Bahamian man aboard a 21-foot fishing skiff next to a Coast Guard Cutter Shrike’s small boat crew, Jan. 25, 2021, near Cay Sal, Bahamas. Coast Guard rescue crews assisted the two fishermen after being separated from their Bahamian fishing vessel, Red Girl, approximately 25 miles west of Cay Sal, Bahamas. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Two Bahamian man aboard a 21-foot fishing skiff next to a Coast Guard Cutter Shrike’s small boat crew, Jan. 25, 2021, near Cay Sal, Bahamas.  (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

MIAMI — Coast Guard rescue crews assisted two fishermen Monday, after being separated from their Bahamian fishing vessel, Red Girl, approximately 25 miles west of Cay Sal, Bahamas.

Coast Guard Cutter Shrike’s rescue crew located the skiff Sunday at approximately 12:30 p.m. and brought the two men aboard due to deteriorating weather, small vessel size and reported fatigue. The rescue crew gave the two men basic first aid, blankets, food and water.

Shrike’s crew utilized radar and VHF radios to help locate and escort the skiff, with the two fisherman, safely back to the Red Girl Monday at approximately 11 a.m.

Two Bahamian man aboard a 21-foot fishing skiff radioed on VHF channel 16 to Coast Guard Sector Key West watchstanders they had been separated from Red Girl Sunday at approximately 8 p.m. near Cay Sal.

An Air Station Miami HC-144 Ocean Sentry aircrew located the skiff visually and helped vectored in the Shrike’s crew to their location. The Ocean Sentry aircrew confirmed the location of the Red Girl on Cay Sal Bank approximately 70 miles east of the skiff.

“It is always good to see a happy ending during a search and rescue case all while bolstering our relationship with our neighboring countries,” said Chief Petty Officer Derek Waters, executive officer-in-charge of Shrike. “We even provided ice to the fisherman, so they could preserve their catch on board.”

The Coast Guard reminds mariners to check the weather before going out, tell someone where you are going and when you’ll be back, wear a life jacket, ensure your safety gear is up to date, and have a registered emergency position indicator radio beacon onboard.

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