Welcome home to Charleston, Cutter James!

The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter James is greeted by friends and family as they moor up in their new homeport of Charleston, S.C., for the first time, Aug. 28, 2015. As the fifth cutter out of the planned eight Legend-class cutters, the James joins its sister ship, the Alexander Hamilton, at its new homeport of Charleston. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Stephen Lehmann)

The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter James is greeted by friends and family as they moor up in their new homeport of Charleston, S.C., for the first time, Aug. 28, 2015.  (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Stephen Lehmann)

CHARLESTON – The Coast Guard Cutter James, the second National Security Cutter for the East Coast, arrived Friday to its inaugural homeport in Charleston.

During its maiden voyage following commissioning events in Boston Aug. 8, the James logged more than 10,000 miles, completed underway certification and made port calls to New York City, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Baltimore, 48 days after leaving the Ingalls Shipbuilding facility in Pascagoula, Mississippi.

“Finally arriving to our inaugural homeport in Charleston is a proud moment, looking forward to being a part of this great community,” said Capt. Andrew J. Tiongson, Cutter James’ commanding officer. “After being away many months from our loved ones, we’re thankful for the safe voyage and happy to be reunited with them”

During the transit from the shipyard and port calls, James’ 119 crew members completed their Ready for Sea training, and completed underway qualifications for deck and engineering watchstanding, as well as for damage control.

In the following months, James and its crew will undergo more training and certification until it deploys next year to conduct maritime law enforcement missions throughout the Western Hemisphere.

The James is the fifth NSC built out of eight planned for the Legend class cutter fleet. Cutter James’ namesake links the next generation of men and women serving aboard to the renowned lifesavers of the past, most notably of Capt. Joshua James, a native of Hull, Massachusetts, who is credited with saving more than 600 lives during his time with the U.S. Life-Saving Service, which merged with the Revenue Cutter Service in 1915 to create the modern U.S. Coast Guard.

Legend-class NSC’s are the largest multipurpose cutters in the Coast Guard fleet and is replacing the 378-foot high endurance cutter, which has been in service since the 1960s. The NSC is 418 feet long and has a top speed of 28 knots and a range of 12,000 nautical miles. It is capable of patrolling in excess of 90 days.

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