Repeat vandalism to navigational aid prompts Coast Guard reminder, warning

d7 logo
CHARLESTON, S.C. — Prompted by reoccurring and costly vandalism to a navigational aid in Johns Island, S.C., the Coast Guard is reminding the public of the dangers and implications of deliberate damage to federal aids to navigation.

Stono Light 39, a navigational light on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway west of Limehouse Bridge, was discovered March 13, 2014, vandalized by gunfire for the third time since June 2012. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Stono Light 39, a navigational light on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway west of Limehouse Bridge, was discovered March 13, 2014, vandalized by gunfire for the third time since June 2012. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Stono Light 39, a navigational light on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway west of Limehouse Bridge, was recently discovered vandalized by gunfire for the third time since June 2012.

“The Intracoastal Waterway is a vital channel for commercial traffic and recreational boaters, and deliberate damage to navigational aids that guide mariners needlessly places all those who use the waterway in danger,” said Senior Chief Petty Officer Mark Williams, officer in charge of Coast Guard Aids to Navigation Team Charleston. “Damaged and non-functional lights greatly diminish boaters’ ability to safely navigate.”

It is the Coast Guard’s responsibility to maintain safe, functioning waterways, and each time Stono Light has been discovered damaged, the entire unit, which costs $726.04, had to be replaced.

“This is an unnecessary expense to U.S. taxpayers and is a waste of the Coast Guard’s valuable and limited resources,” said Williams.

The maximum penalty for such vandalism is up to 20 years of imprisonment and a possible fine of $2,500 per day for each violation.

Anyone who discovers a damaged or missing aid or has information about vandalism to an aid is urged to contact the nearest Coast Guard unit as soon as possible.

Related Posts

Comments are closed.