Progress made in Lone Star recovery near Dillingham, Alaska

Coast Guard Alaska News
ANCHORAGE, Alaska − Salvage crews successfully moved the partially submerged fishing vessel Lone Star toward shallow water in the Igushik River near Dillingham, Monday.

The Coast Guard has monitored the progress of the salvage effort since the vessel capsized in the river June 30.

A pair of cranes were used to attach chains to the bow and stern sections of the vessel and move it toward the east shore. The relocation of the vessel is an important step in Resolve-Magone Marine Services’ plan to remove the vessel from the river. Once the Lone Star is moved into the shallow waters of the Igushik River’s east shore, crews plan to use hoses to remove water and mud from the interior of the vessel. Upon refloating the vessel, the crews plan to tow the Lone Star to Dutch Harbor.

The mast of the fishing vessel Lone Star juts from the water of the Igushik River near Dillingham, Alaska, as salvage crews work to recover the vessel Sept. 21, 2013. The Lone Star overturned and sank within 18 feet of water June 30. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Daniel Peters.

The mast of the fishing vessel Lone Star juts from the water of the Igushik River near Dillingham, Alaska, as salvage crews work to recover the vessel Sept. 21, 2013. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Daniel Peters.

“The Coast Guard’s concern is with ensuring the waterway is safe for navigation, and that the salvage operation is conducted in a safe manner.,” said Lt. Daniel Peters of the Coast Guard Sector Anchorage prevention department. “We sympathize with anyone whose livelihood or use of the waterway has been adversely affected by the Lone Star salvage efforts, and we’ll continue to work with our agency partners and the salvage crews to remove the vessel from the river.”

The response to the Lone Star began when the vessel capsized and partially submerged in 18 feet of water with reportedly 14,000 gallons of diesel, 150 gallons of lube oil, 150 gallons of hydraulic fluid and 250 gallons of gasoline aboard. It was reported a change in tide swung the ship against the anchor chair, detaching the transducer and coolant lines. This created a hole in the steel hull and caused the vessel to take on water.

The Coast Guard, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Department of the Interior and Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation responded to the incident along with Resolve-Magone Marine Services and Alaska Chadux Corporation, contractors hired by the responsible party to mitigate the pollution and remove the vessel from the river.

For the original article concerning this event, click here.

Click the photo for additional pictures of the operation.

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