Disabled Coast Guard boat recovered off Oahu

A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium from Station Honolulu is anchored 250 yards offshore Laie, Oahu, following the rescue of a 72-year-old male and four Coast Guard personnel, May 12, 2015. The Coast Guard is coordinating with the Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Conservation and Resource Enforcement and the Department of Transportation Hazard Evaluation Emergency Response office. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Chad Pendarvis)

A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium from Station Honolulu is anchored 250 yards offshore Laie, Oahu, following the rescue of a 72-year-old male and four Coast Guard personnel, May 12, 2015. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Chad Pendarvis)

HONOLULU — A Coast Guard 45-foot Response Boat-Medium anchored off Laie Point after becoming disabled has been removed and was towed to Coast Guard Station Honolulu, Wednesday.

A RB-M boat crew from Station Honolulu removed the disabled RB-M from its anchorage and towed it to the Coast Guard Cutter Ahi. Ahi towed the RB-M to Station Honolulu.

A jet ski crew from Marine Corps Base Hawaii Waterfront Operations assisted in the operation.

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point was on-scene acting as a safety observer.

The RB-M became stranded after attempting to take the 55-foot disabled sailing vessel Doubloon in tow Tuesday morning. The Doubloon drifted into the surf zone and broke apart in the 8-10 foot seas.

The Coast Guard coordinated with the Department of Land and Natural Resources Land Division to clean up the affected shoreline near Laie. DLNR has removed all visible hazardous material from the shoreline. Shoreline debris recovery continued today.

The Coast Guard urges the public to remain clear of Laie beach until debris from sailing vessel Doubloon has been removed.

“Coast Guard operations are inherently dangerous. The men and women of the Coast Guard diligently train everyday to become proficient in all task including their own vessel becoming disabled,” said Capt. Shannon Gilreath, commanding officer Sector Honolulu. “I am thankful no one was injured during this evolution.”

The cause of the incident is under investigation.

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