Container Ship Moved from Savannah River Navigation Channel

SAVANNAH, Ga. – A container ship that had previously been anchored in the Savannah River near Elba Island, Ga., has been safely moved from the navigation channel to a nearby dock.

The container ship MSC Korea, which lost power while transiting out-bound from the Port of Savannah around 1:00 a.m. today, will remain moored until Coast Guard investigators are able to determine the cause of the incident and all affected ship systems have been adequately repaired.

The MSC Korea was unable to restore shipboard power and retrieve its anchor therefore the anchor chain had to be cut before the vessel was moved from the navigation channel. As a result, the Savannah River remains closed to vessel traffic within one mile up and down river of day mark 44, located near the north end of Elba Island.

The Savannah District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is assisting the Coast Guard by conducting a survey of the Savannah River to pinpoint the location of the anchor and anchor chain. The information provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will assist the Coast Guard Captain of the Port in determining if commercial vessel traffic can safely transit through the area where the anchor lies. A requirement to remove the anchor and chain has been issued to the MSC Korea.

No oil spill occurred with this incident as confirmed through on-scene assessments conducted by personnel attached to Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Savannah, Station Tybee, and Air Station Savannah. However, the Coast Guard, Georgia Department of Natural Resources Environmental Protection Division, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration were prepared to commence an immediate environmental response.

The Coast Guard continues to investigate the cause of this incident.

 

Aerial photo of MSC KOREA at anchor in the Savannah River. Photo credit Coast Guard Air Station Savannah.

Aerial photo of MSC KOREA at anchor in the Savannah River.Photo credit Air Station Savannah.

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One Comment

  1. JIM MACKEY says:

    I would like to know how much trouble and cost is incurred in getting back power to the ship so it can continue on its way and if the anchor had to be cut, how is it being moored to keep it from drifting seriously back and forth even with tiedown ropes. Lastly why didn’t the ships systems give them an indication that they were abpout to lose all of its power and leave it dead in the water unless they onboard navigation and propulsion systems are ancient and not up to dat which makes they dangerous from a safety standpoint from now on until they upgradeand go thru extensive safety and QA/QC?