Coast Guard urges mariners to be prepared after busy boating weekend

1st Coast Guard District News
NEW YORK – Coast Guard crews and Good Samaritans across the Tri-state area had a busy Mother’s Day weekend responding to cases of mariners in distress, and numerous vessel voyage terminations.

The following is a synopsis of significant cases that occurred in the Tri-state area.

A boarding officer from Coast Guard Station New London, Conn., terminated the voyage of a recreational boater, Saturday, following a failed vessel safety examination in which the boaters had no life jackets and no sound signaling devices.

A boarding officer from Coast Guard Station New London, Conn., terminated the voyage of a recreational boater, Saturday, following a failed vessel safety examination in which the boater had insufficient sound signaling devices.

A boarding officer from Coast Guard Station New London, Conn., terminated the voyage of a recreational boater, Saturday, following a failed vessel safety examination in which the boater had insufficient sound signaling devices and the vessel was not equipped with the required throwable floatation device.

A boarding officer from Coast Guard Station Fire Island, N.Y., terminated the voyage of a recreational vessel, Saturday, following a failed vessel safety examination following the discovery of underage drinking and operating a vessel under the influence of alcohol and controlled substance. The vessel was brought back to a local marina and the operators parents were contacted to pick up the vessel.

A Good Samaritan rescued three boaters from a capsized vessel near Raritan Bay, N.J., Saturday. The Good Samaritan transported the boaters to Keyport Harbor, N.J., where they were evaluated by emergency medical services and released. The owner is making arrangements for the vessel to be salvaged.

A Good Samaritan assisted a boater with putting out an engine room fire at the Castleton Boat Club, N.Y., Saturday. There were no reported injuries and the vessel is safely moored with no reported pollution in the area.

“Practicing proper boating safety is important for every vessel on the water,” said Lt. Alfred Betts, the command duty officer at Coast Guard Sector New York. “Knowing the type of gear needed for your vessel and how to safely operate it is the responsibility of everyone aboard. By ensuring that you and your passengers know where your equipment is located on the vessel, how to use it and the condition it is in, you will be better prepared for situations that can occur during an outing on your vessel.”

For more information about how you can be prepared before heading out onto the water visit the Coast Guard Auxiliary’s Vessel Safety Check site.

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