Coast Guard Recognizes Efforts to Establish Cutter Transition Division

Rear Adm. Joseph Vojvodich (far right), the Coast Guard’s director of acquisition programs and program executive officer, recognizes members of the Cutter Transition Division with flag letters for their work at a ceremony in Baltimore Feb. 6, 2015. The four CTD members shown are (from left): Chief Petty Officer Robert Loeffler, Chief Warrant Officer Jason Drzewicki, Petty Officer 1st Class Chad Ball and Lt. Sam Blase. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Rear Adm. Joseph Vojvodich (far right), the Coast Guard’s director of acquisition programs and program executive officer, recognizes members of the Cutter Transition Division with flag letters for their work at a ceremony in Baltimore Feb. 6, 2015. The four CTD members shown are (from left): Chief Petty Officer Robert Loeffler, Chief Warrant Officer Jason Drzewicki, Petty Officer 1st Class Chad Ball and Lt. Sam Blase. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Baltimore – The Coast Guard awarded a Meritorious Team Commendation to the implementation team behind the Cutter Transition Division – a new Asset Project Office division in charge of managing and streamlining decommissioning and disposition of the 110-foot patrol boats – at a ceremony in Baltimore Feb. 6, 2015.

Rear Adm. Joseph Vojvodich, the Coast Guard’s director of acquisition programs and program executive officer, presented the award to the CTD Implementation Team, which comprised members from staffs and centers across the Coast Guard who have worked on the CTD since its creation in January 2014.

“The vision, energy and team collaboration was instrumental in aligning planning and strategic messaging that led to flag-level approval to stand up the new division to manage the disposition of 37 Island-class patrol boats scheduled for decommissioning over the next eight years,” the CTD Implementation Team commendation read. “As a result of the team’s commitment to excellence, the division achieved initial operational capability on Oct. 27, 2014, was ready to support the decommissioning of the first two Island-class patrol boats, and now serves as a model for customer focus and service delivery.”

Vojvodich also presented flag letters to CTD members who were not part of the CTD Implementation Team but who still played an important role in the division’s formation. The division is expected to achieve full operational capability by late summer 2016.

The CTD has already begun streamlining processes that had previously been spread between the decommissioning cutter, numerous headquarters directorates and staffs, and centers in charge of sustainment. The CTD took custody of the decommissioned 110-foot patrol boats Staten Island and Jefferson Island on Oct. 17, 2014, and will continue to take custody of each patrol boat after decommissioning. The division will handle vessel caretaking, maintenance, provisioning, and property management and tracking. The centralization and management of these processes will increase efficiency and make it easier to apply lessons learned during each decommissioning.

The CTD’s work reduces the burden on cutter crews by providing guides to the decommissioning process and saves money by allowing crew reassignment immediately following decommissioning, allowing the Coast Guard to realize savings a year sooner than keeping crews in place until the cutter had transferred to a foreign partner. The CTD is also facilitating cutter transfers through the Excess Defense Articles program by supporting the Coast Guard Office of International Acquisition Programs in conducting joint visual inspections with foreign partners. The CTD is developing training programs for operating the 110-foot patrol boats and will train foreign crews after transfer.

Since taking custody of the cutters Staten Island and Jefferson Island, the CTD has already removed parts worth approximately $1.2 million per cutter and reintroduced them into Coast Guard and Navy supply chains for use on ships that are still operational.

The Coast Guard plans to decommission four 110-foot patrol boats in March 2015 and two more in August 2015. The service will continue to decommission 110-foot patrol boats as it acquires new fast response cutters.

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