Coast Guard recognizes 45th Master Cutterman

Rear Adm. David R. Callahan, commander, 8th Coast Guard District, congratulates Master Chief Petty Officer Robert Eagleton on becoming the 45th Master Cutterman of the Coast Guard, Sept. 2, 2015. The Coast Guard’s Master Cutterman program was created in April 2007, to formally recognize those members who have distinguished themselves throughout their careers with more than 20 years of sea service. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Jonathan Lally)

Rear Adm. David R. Callahan congratulates Master Chief Petty Officer Robert Eagleton on becoming the 45th Master Cutterman of the Coast Guard, Sept. 2, 2015. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Jonathan Lally)

VICKSBURG, Miss. — Coast Guard Master Chief Petty Officer Robert Eagleton was recognized as the Coast Guard’s 45th Master Cutterman in Vicksburg, Wednesday.

Eagleton serves as the officer in charge of the Coast Guard Cutter Kickapoo with more than 20 years of total sea time.

Rear Adm. David R. Callahan, commander, 8th Coast Guard District, presided over the ceremony in Vicksburg to honor Eagleton.

“This is a cutterman’s cutterman standing before you today and you don’t see to many of them today,” said Callahan. “Master Chief Eagleton is among a rare bread who are considered the backbone of the Coast Guard, which has its roots embedded in the service’s predecessor, the Revenue Cutter Service.”

Master Cutterman Eagleton joined the Coast Guard in 1989 and started his Coast Guard career as a cutterman on the Coast Guard Cutter Acushnet and served on several other Coast Guard cutters as well as serving at some shore-based units.

The Coast Guard’s Master Cutterman program was created in April 2007, to formally recognize those members who have distinguished themselves throughout their careers with more than 20 years of sea service. The first Master Cutterman certificate was presented to Chief Warrant Officer Paul Dilger at his retirement ceremony in July 2007. While many Coast Guardsmen have proudly been named as permanent cuttermen, serving more than five years afloat, only a select few have endured the rigors of sea duty for 20 years.

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