Coast Guard Port Security Unit 307 holds change of command in Clearwater, Fla

Southeastern Coast Guard News
CLEARWATER, Fla. — Crewmembers from Coast Guard Port Security Unit 307, a Reserve unit homeported in Clearwater, hosted a change of command ceremony Saturday.

Rear Adm. Kurt B. Hinrichs, Coast Guard Pacific Area’s senior reserve officer, presided over the change of command as Cmdr. Eric S. Bernstein relieved Cmdr. James B. Wallace as the commanding officer of PSU 307 at Air Station Clearwater.

“My tour here has been very exciting and fulfilling,” said Wallace. “I’ve been privileged to get to train, coach, teach, mentor, prepare and lead the unit into a combat zone, something most active duty Coast Guard officers never get the chance to do, much less Reserve officers.”

Established in May 1999 as a Coast Guard Reserve unit, PSU 307 is one of eight PSUs in the Coast Guard that provides security and protects personnel and facilities from terrorism, sabotage, espionage, subversion and attack.

“My success here has really been the unit’s success,” said Wallace. They have multiple jobs, families, and children. I’m amazed at what they do each and every day. It was my honor and privilege to be of service to the members of PSU 307.”

PSUs are deployable units organized for sustained expeditionary operations. They can deploy within 96 hours of recall, establish operations within 24 hours once in theater, and are self-sufficient for up to 30 days except for fuel and water.

PSUs provide waterborne security and limited land-based protection for shipping lanes and critical port facilities at the end points of United States’ Sea Lines of Communication.

“I am honored to take command of Port Security Unit 307 today,” said Bernstein. “This unit has an exceptional record of operational excellence with several deployments in support of the Coast Guard’s homeland security and defense operations missions. I have already observed how both the Reserve and active duty members mesh into a cohesive team of professionals to carry out their responsibilities. I look forward to leading the officers and crew of PSU 307 into the next chapter of its history.”

A change of command ceremony is a time-honored tradition that is important to the transfer of command. The formality of the occasion is an acknowledgement of respect for authority which is vital to a military organization. The ceremony represents more than just the relief of one commanding officer by another. It is the transfer of absolute authority and responsibility for a military unit of the United States and its assigned missions.

Click the photo for more from the ceremony.

Cmdr. Eric S. Bernstein, left, salutes Cmdr. James B. Wallace, former commanding officer of Coast Guard Port Security Unit 307, a Reserve unit home-ported in Clearwater, Fla., formally transferring command during a ceremony at Air Station Clearwater, Aug. 17, 2013. Established in May 1999 as a Coast Guard Reserve unit, PSU 307 is one of eight PSUs in the Coast Guard that provides security and protects personnel and facilities from terrorism, sabotage, espionage, subversion and attack. (U.S. Coast Guard photo Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael De Nyse)

Cmdr. Eric S. Bernstein, left, salutes Cmdr. James B. Wallace, former commanding officer of Coast Guard Port Security Unit 307, a Reserve unit home-ported in Clearwater, Fla., formally transferring command during a ceremony at Air Station Clearwater, Aug. 17, 2013. (U.S. Coast Guard photo Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael De Nyse)

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