Coast Guard, partners continue work to salvage Pacific Paradise

Responders continue work to salvage the commercial fishing vessel Pacific Paradise still grounded just off Kaimana Beach on Oahu, Hawaii, Nov. 4, 2017. Salvage experts from Resolve Marine Group, Global Diving and Salvage, Pacific Environmental Corporation and the Coast Guard Salvage Engineering Response Team from the Marine Safety Center surveyed the vessel and are working to further develop and update the salvage plan. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Coast Guard Sector Honolulu/Released)

Responders continue work to salvage the commercial fishing vessel Pacific Paradise still grounded just off Kaimana Beach on Oahu, Hawaii, Nov. 4, 2017.  (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Coast Guard Sector Honolulu)

HONOLULU — Work continues Wednesday to address the salvage needs of the Pacific Paradise, aground off Kaimana Beach, Oahu.

The Captain of the Port of Honolulu, Capt. Michael Long, met Wednesday morning with stakeholders to discuss the ongoing environmental concerns associated with the grounded vessel.

In attendance were representatives from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Transportation Harbors Division, Department of Land and Natural Resources, Department of Health, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, National Pollution Funds Center and salvage team members. The federal and state agencies are partners in the response efforts and have had input in the process from the beginning when the vessel grounded just before midnight Oct. 10.

The robust salvage team comprised of the contractors and experts from Resolve Marine Group, Global Diving and Salvage, Pacific Environmental Corporation and the Coast Guard Salvage Engineering Response Team continue to revise and update the salvage plan as they survey the vessel and gather further data. The COTP was to meet with the responsible party late Wednesday afternoon.

The goal of the response at this point is to prepare the vessel for efforts to refloat and remove it in the safest way possible with the least impact to the environment.

As soon as the vessel is removed from the reef, the Department of Land and Natural Resources’ Division of Aquatic Resources will put expert teams into the water to assess damages to the coral reef and determine appropriate steps for restoration and mitigation.

The site immediately around the vessel and the vessel itself are dangerous as it remains in an active surf zone and the structure of the vessel is compromised. Non-response personnel should stay outside the 500-yard safety zone that remains in effect around the vessel.

Previous articles about the grounding can be viewed here and here.

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