Coast Guard medevacs woman south of Atlantic Beach, NC

5th Coast Guard District News
WILMINGTON, N.C. — The Coast Guard medevaced a 57-year-old woman Sunday approximately 14 miles southwest of Atlantic Beach.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector North Carolina in Wilmington received a call from the operator of the 27-foot vessel Poseydon Dive at approximately12:15 p.m., reporting a woman aboard was suffering from seasickness and losing consciousness.

Atlantic Beach, N.C., Fire Dept. EMT (left) and Coast Guard Station Fort Macon crewmembers aboard a 47-foot Motor Lifeboat (MLB) provide medical assistance for a woman suffering from seasickness south of Atlantic Beach, N.C., July 20, 2014.  A 25-foot Response Boat-Small crew transported and trasferred EMTs to the MLB crew who had taken the woman aboard after she began to lose conciousness on a 27-foot pleasure craft.  U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy of Station Fort Macon

Atlantic Beach, N.C., Fire Dept. EMT (left) and Coast Guard Station Fort Macon crewmembers aboard a 47-foot Motor Lifeboat (MLB) provide medical assistance for a woman suffering from seasickness south of Atlantic Beach, N.C., July 20, 2014. U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy of Station Fort Macon

Personnel from Coast Guard Station Fort Macon in Atlantic Beach launched a 47-foot Motor Lifeboat (MLB) crew to assist.

The MLB crew arrived on scene, placed the woman on oxygen and transferred her to the MLB. While transiting back to the station, a second boat crew aboard a 25-foot Response Boat-Small (RB-S) from Station Fort Macon met up with the MLB crew and transferred two EMTs from Atlantic Beach Fire Department to provide the woman with advanced medical care.

The MLB crew transported the woman to Station Fort Macon where she was placed in the care of awaiting EMS and taken to Carteret General Hospital in Morehead City.

“We were conducting training in different boats when the call came in, said Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeremy Ronzio, officer of the day at Station Fort Macon. “This medevac required that we run back to shore to switch boats. Our crews demonstrated their versatility and efficiency today by changing to the required operating platform with short notice in minimal time. We utilized the size and stability of the MLB as the primary rescue platform and the speed of the RB-S to deliver the EMTs.”

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