Coast Guard Group/Air Station North Bend to hold change of command

13th Coast Guard District NewsASTORIA, Ore. – Capt. Mark E. Reynolds will relieve Capt. Scott A. Kitchen of command of U.S. Coast Guard Group/Air Station North Bend, Ore., during a change-of-command ceremony on Friday, July 22, 2011, at 11 a.m.

The ceremony will be held at Group/Air Station North Bend, located at 2000 Connecticut Avenue, North Bend.

Capt. Kitchen, who assumed command of Group/Air Station North Bend in August 2008, will retire this November after serving the American public for more than 25 years. His career achievements include, but are not limited to, receiving the 2006 Capt. Witherspoon Inspirational Leadership Awards for his role in the coordination of the Coast Guard’s historic rescue of more than 33,500 people following Hurricane Katrina.

Capt. Reynolds’ previous assignment was at the Coast Guard’s Office of Aviation Forces at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., where he served as the Unmanned Aeronautical Systems liaison to Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR). Prior to that assignment, he served as Deputy Group Commander/Executive Officer at Group/Air Station North Bend from 2006-09.

Capt. Reynolds is a 1987 graduate of Clemson University with a Bachelor of Science degree in secondary education. He graduated from U.S. Coast Guard Officer Candidate School in December 1988. His personal awards include, but are not limited to the 2003 Coast Guard Foundation Award and the 2003 Naval Helicopter Association Western Region Search and Rescue Aircrew of the Year.

Rear Adm. Keith A. Taylor, Commander of the 13th Coast Guard District, will preside over the ceremony.

Group North Bend is responsible for U.S. Coast Guard operations from Pacific City, Ore., to the California border, which is approximately 220 miles of coastline, and 50 nautical miles offshore. Group/Air Station North Bend is staffed by over 500 active duty, reserve duty, civilian and Auxiliary men and women who annually conducted more than 500 search-and-rescue missions and executed more than 800 law enforcement boardings.

The change of command is a time-honored tradition and deeply rooted in Coast Guard and Naval history. The event signifies a total transfer of responsibility, authority and accountability for the command. The ceremony is witnessed by all members so that they all know exactly when the transfer of leadership takes place.

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