Coast Guard Cutter Seneca returns to Boston after interdicting 151 migrants

Petty Officer 3rd Class Jeffery Evans passes out water to some Haitian migrants aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Seneca to keep them hydrated Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017. The cutter Seneca crew transported 151 Haitian migrants to the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Cmdr. Krystyn Pecora

Petty Officer 3rd Class Jeffery Evans passes out water to some Haitian migrants aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Seneca to keep them hydrated Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Cmdr. Krystyn Pecora

BOSTON — The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Seneca returned to their homeport of Boston, Saturday after a 45-day patrol that resulted in the interdiction and transfer of 151 Haitian migrants.

During the patrol, Seneca interdicted and transferred two groups of Haitian migrants to the Royal Bahamian Defense Force. The first interdiction occurred on Aug. 9, when Coast Guard Cutter Bernard C. Webber interdicted 73 migrants on an overloaded 50-foot Haitian sail freighter and then transferred them to the Seneca later that day. The second occurred on Aug. 11, when a Coast Guard aircraft spotted a 40-foot Haitian sail freighter with 78 migrants aboard. The crew of the Seneca diverted to the scene and interdicted the migrants.

In addition to conducting alien migrant interdiction operations, Seneca also conducted living marine resources boardings near the coast of Jacksonville, Florida as part of the Coast Guard’s mission to ensure proper stewardship of the nation’s resources.

In the final days of their patrol, the crew conducted helicopter deck landing qualifications off the Massachusetts coast. This entailed a three-day long training in which Seneca hosted members from units throughout the East Coast as they earned their helicopter operation qualifications, helping to ensure the operational readiness of the fleet.

“It’s great to get back to our families and spend time with them after this patrol.” said Cmdr. Alan B. McCabe, commanding officer of Seneca. “The two weeks in port will be vital for the crew to recharge before we head to a three-month maintenance period in Brooklyn. This maintenance period will help to ensure the ship is ready to respond to all missions while the Coast Guard awaits the arrival of the Offshore Patrol Cutter starting in 2021, which will serve as the replacement for the aging medium endurance fleet.”

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