Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba returns to Boston following 61-day fisheries patrol

The Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba is at its home port in Boston Sept. 15, 2015 after a 61-day fisheries patrol in the waters off New England. During the 9,100 nautical mile patrol to enforce fisheries laws, the crew conducted 103 boardings, resulting in 14 violations, and assisted the crews aboard four disabled fishing vessels. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

The Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba is at its home port in Boston Sept. 15, 2015 after a 61-day fisheries patrol in the waters off New England. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

BOSTON — The crew of Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba returned to their homeport Tuesday following a two-month patrol in the waters off New England.

During the 9,100 nautical mile patrol to enforce fisheries laws, the crew conducted 103 boardings, resulting in 14 violations, assisted the crews aboard four disabled fishing vessels, conducted three gun shoots, refueling at sea, and numerous damage control drills.

“We are elated to return to Boston after this successful patrol,” said Ensign Alexandra Rennie, a deck watch officer aboard the Escanaba. “We were given the opportunity to carry out a number of crucial Coast Guard missions, including fisheries enforcement and search and rescue.”

The Coast Guard’s living marine resource patrols are vital to the country’s economy and health. If the United States is to enjoy a rich, diverse, and sustainable ocean environment, then the Coast Guard must assist in halting the degradation of our ocean’s natural resources associated with maritime activities. Coupled with enforcing fisheries laws, the Coast Guard ensures the safety of the North Atlantic fishing fleet.

The 270-foot Escanaba is a Medium Endurance Cutter with a crew of 100. The Escanaba was commissioned into Coast Guard service Aug. 29, 1987.

Nearing its 30th year of service, Escanaba and the other 26 aging medium endurance cutters are slated for replacement by the new Offshore Patrol Cutter.

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