Coast Guard Cutter Eagle to host change of command ceremony

CHARLESTON, S.C. – The Coast Guard Cutter Eagle is scheduled to host a change of command ceremony at the passenger terminal Saturday at 9 a.m.

Captain Eric C. Jones will assume responsibility as commanding officer of Eagle from Capt. Chris Sinnett during a time-honored ceremony that formally transfers authority and accountability from one individual to another.

Sinnett has been Eagle’s commanding officer since July 2006. His previous afloat assignments include:
Student engineer – Coast Guard Cutter Taney, Portsmouth, Va.
Damage control assistant – Coast Guard Cutter Tampa – Portsmouth
Executive officer – Coast Guard Cutter Naushon – Ketchikan, Alaska
Commanding officer – Coast Guard Cutter Manitou – Miami Beach, Fla.
Executive officer – Coast Guard Cutter Eagle – New London, Conn.
Commanding officer – Coast Guard Cutter Spencer – Boston

Jones reports to Eagle after serving as the deputy chief, Coast Guard Office of Congressional and Government Affairs, at United States Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, DC. His previous afloat assignments include:

Deck watch officer and 1st lieutenant – Coast Guard Cutter Venturous – Long Beach, Calif.
Commanding officer and plankowner – Coast Guard Cutter Tybee – San Diego
Navigator and executive officer – Coast Guard Cutter Eagle – New London
Executive officer – Coast Guard Cutter Forward – Portsmouth

Jones most recently served afloat as the commanding officer of the 270-foot Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane homeported in Portsmouth.

Coast Guard Cutter Eagle is the seventh U.S. Coast Guard cutter to bear the name in a proud line dating back to 1792. The ship was built in 1936 by the Blohm and Voss Shipyard in Hamburg, Germany and commissioned as Horst Wessel, one of three sail-training ships operated by Nazi Germany to train cadets for the growing German Navy.

Following World War II, it was taken as a war prize by the United States. A U.S. Coast Guard crew, aided by the German crew still onboard, sailed the tall ship in 1946 from Bremerhaven, Germany to its new homeport in New London.

Eagle now serves as a seagoing classroom for future officers of the U.S. Coast Guard. A seasoned permanent crew of six officers and 55 enlisted personnel maintain the ship year round and provide a strong base of knowledge and seamanship for the training of up to 150 cadets or officer candidates at a time.

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