Tug Respect lifted from the Oakland estuary

Pacific Southwest Coast Guard News
ALAMEDA, Calif. — The Coast Guard, the Environmental Protection Agency and California Department of Resources, Recycling and Recovery, joined efforts to successfully lift the tug Respect, a 150-foot sunken vessel, from the Oakland estuary on Dec. 19, 2013.

On Oct. 17, 2013, the Coast Guard was notified by the EPA of a potential pollution threat from the Respect. After further research on the sunken tug, the Coast Guard determined that it posed a substantial threat to human health and the environment and needed to be removed.

ALAMEDA, Calif. - The tug Respect is hauled to the surface of the Oakland Estuary Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2013. The tug, which sank at its moorings in 2007,  will be transported to a nearby yard for scrapping. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Thomas McKenzie

ALAMEDA, Calif. – The tug Respect is hauled to the surface of the Oakland Estuary Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2013. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Thomas McKenzie

The tug sank in 2007, but earlier this year the EPA found traces of tar balls and heavy fuel oil in the vessel.

On Dec. 2, Global Diving and Salvage Inc. commenced rigging operations to raise, assess and defuel the Respect.

On Dec. 18, lifting operations began and were successfully completed on Dec. 19. The tug was transferred to Bay Ship and Yacht in Alameda, Calif.

The Coast Guard, EPA and CalRecycle will work together to remove the oil and hazardous materials before disposing of the vessel.

“This is yet another example of what can be accomplished in the Bay area when federal, state and local partners marshal resources and efforts” said Capt. Gregory Stump, the Coast Guard’s operational commander for northern Calif. “No single entity could have achieved this mammoth undertaking given the fiscal realities at all levels of government, however, side-by-side we can and will tackle the most difficult challenges that lie ahead. Thanks to all for a job well done!”

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