11th Coast Guard District names active duty, reserve person of the year 2014

Vice Adm. Charles Ray, commander, Coast Guard Pacific Area (far left), and Rear Adm. Joseph Servidio, commander, 11th Coast Guard District (far right), congratulate the 2014 Active Duty and Reserve Person of the Year during a ceremony held at Coast Guard Training Center Petaluma, Calif., Friday, April 3, 2015. The EPOY is Petty Officer 3rd Class Giacomo Terrizzi, a marine science technician assigned to Coast Guard Sector San Diego, (center left) and the REPOY is Petty Officer 1st Class Ransford Vawters, a boatswain’s mate assigned to Coast Guard Station Rio Vista, Calif. (center right). U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jordan Akiyama.

Vice Adm. Charles Ray, commander, Coast Guard Pacific Area (far left), and Rear Adm. Joseph Servidio, commander, 11th Coast Guard District (far right), congratulate the 2014 Active Duty and Reserve Person of the Year during a ceremony held at Coast Guard Training Center Petaluma, Calif., Friday, April 3, 2015. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jordan Akiyama.

ALAMEDA, Calif. – The 2014 Active Duty and Reserve Enlisted Person of the Year for the 11th Coast Guard District were honored during a recognition banquet at Coast Guard Training Center Petaluma, Friday.

The Active Duty Enlisted Person of the Year is Petty Officer 3rd Class Giacomo Terrizzi, a marine science technician assigned to Coast Guard Sector San Diego.

The Reserve Person of the Year is Petty Officer 1st Class Ransford Vawters, a boatswain’s mate assigned to Coast Guard Station Rio Vista.

Terrizzi is a native of Manchester, New Jersey, has achieved qualifications in pollution response, waterways management and facility inspections. Terrizzi volunteers on his off time as Sector San Diego’s color guard coordinator and as a softball coach. He also holds a bachelor’s degree in Investigative Services from the University of New Haven in West Haven, Connecticut, and is currently pursuing a master’s degree in organizational leadership.

Vawters hails from Columbus, Ohio, and has qualified nine fellow Coast Guard members, excelled in the practical pistol course and is a critical incident stress management team member. Vewters, a deputy sheriff with Washoe County, Nevada, is pursing a master’s degree in clinical social work with the intention of counseling veterans. He has volunteered more than 20 hours of group therapy support during his clinical internship.

“The reason the Coast Guard is successful is because of the women and men who go out each and every day,” said Rear Adm. Joseph Servidio, commander of the 11th Coast Guard District. “And today is our opportunity to recognize some of those men and women who have stepped it up. And they’re going to be the leaders and the reasons why the Coast Guard is even more successful tomorrow than today.”

The EPOY program is designed to highlight those who demonstrate exceptional standards of proficiency and conduct and reflect the Coast Guard’s core values of honor, respect and devotion to duty at work and in their personal lives.

“The power of our service is in the unity of what we can do together,” said Vice Adm. Charles W. Ray, commander of Coast Guard Pacific Area. “The fact is with Coast Guard men and women, like the ones represented here tonight, they are a force for good in their community, and whether they’re there for two years or ten years, they do great things and represent our service well.”

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